One School to Change the Future

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Scientific Research Findings on
Consciousness-Based Education

Developing Enlightened Students and an Invincible Nation

Consciousness-Based Education has been applied in schools and universities worldwide for the past 35 years. This educational approach integrates the study of standard academic subjects with the knowledge and technology of consciousness—the Transcendental Meditation and TM-Sidhi programs—which systematically develop the latent creative potential of students and teachers. As the students are studying the different disciplines, at the same time they are expanding their ability to learn and to creatively apply knowledge; and growing in inner happiness, compassion, and confidence.

Particularly significant for society as a whole is the repeated scientific finding that when large groups practice the advanced technology of consciousness together in one place, negative and disorderly social trends measurably decrease and positive trends increase. Schools applying Consciousness-Based Education thus benefit not only the students and teachers individually; they radiate a beneficial influence in the community and—if many schools participate—in the entire country. Through such schools, national consciousness can become so integrated that no chaotic or weakening influences from within the country or outside its borders can take hold—the nation will become increasingly invincible.

Extensive Scientific Research on Consciousness-Based Education

The unique effectiveness of this integrated approach to education has been scientifically documented over the past 40 years. More than 600 scientific research studies, conducted at over 250 universities and research institutes in 33 countries, verify the profound benefits of Consciousness-Based Education for all aspects of individual life and society.

Collected Papers

The selected research findings below are particularly relevant to education. (See Bibilography.)

Note: The numbers in parentheses after each of the following findings indicate the references of the original research papers, which are listed at the end of this document.

1. Improved Brain Functioning, Increased Intelligence, and Improved Academic Performance

Greater Use of Total Brain Functioning

  • Mobilization of the Hidden Reserves of the Brain (1)
  • Increased Efficiency of Information Transfer in the Brain (2–5)
  • Greater Adaptability of Brain Functioning (6)
  • Increased Blood Flow to the Brain (7)
  • Increased Coherence of Brain Functioning (8–9)
  • Maximum Coherence of Brain Wave Activity (Electroencephalogram—EEG) During Yogic Flying Practice of the TM-Sidhi Program (10–11)

Increased Intelligence and Mental Ability

  • Increased Intelligence (12–16)
  • Improved Memory (17–18)
  • Accelerated Cognitive Development in Children (19–20)
  • Increased Efficiency of Concept Learning (21)
  • Broader Comprehension and Improved Ability To Focus Attention—Increased Field Independence (22–23)

Increased Creativity

  • Enhanced Creativity (13, 24–25)
  • Increased Innovation (13)
  • Increased Cognitive Flexibility (17–18)

Improved Attention and Reduced Distraction

  • Decreased Distraction Effects in EEG (26)
  • More Effective Executive Functioning of the Brain Indicated by Diminished EEG Distraction Effects (27)
  • More Efficient Attention Deployment During Choice Reaction Time Task (28)

Improved Academic Performance

  • Improved Academic Performance in Elementary and Secondary School (29–30)
  • Improved Academic Performance in College and Post-Graduate Study (31–32)
  • Improved Educational Outcomes—Primary and Secondary School Students Performing in the top 1% on National Standardized Tests; Secondary School Students Winning State Competitions in All Academic Areas, and in Athletics (79)
  • Increased Time Competence: Increased Ability To Think and Act Efficiently in the Present (33–35)
  • Increased Efficiency and Productivity (36–37)

2. Increased Integration of Personality

Growth of Positive Qualities

  • Increased Self-Actualization: Increased Integration, Unity, and Wholeness of Personality (33–35)
  • Higher Levels of Self Development (38)
  • Orientation towards Positive Values (39)
  • Enhanced Self-Regard and Self-Esteem (13, 40–42)
  • Enhanced Inner Well-Being (17)
  • Increased Emotional Stability (43–45)

Reduction of Negative Qualities

  • Decreased Anxiety (13, 37, 44–47)
  • Decreased Tension (37, 43)
  • Decreased Depression (40, 43–44)
  • Decreased Hostility and Aggression (48–49)
  • Decreased Impulsiveness (50)
  • Less Sensitivity to Criticism (40)

3. Improved School-Related Behavior

Reduced Behavior Problems in School

  • Decreased Absenteeism (51)
  • Decreased Rule Infractions (51)
  • Decreased Suspension Days (51)
  • Decreased Dropout Rate from School in Economically Deprived Adolescents with Learning Problems (41)
  • Decreased Use of Cigarettes, Alcohol, and Drugs (37, 44, 52–53)

Growth of Ideal Social Behavior

  • Increased Tolerance (13, 54)
  • Increased Capacity for Warm Interpersonal Relationships (34, 43, 54)
  • Improved Work and Personal Relationships (37)
  • Increased Ability To Be Objective, Fair-Minded, and Reasonable (54)
  • Increased Sensitivity to the Feelings of Others (54)
  • Improved Interpersonal Behavior of Juvenile Offenders (42)

Benefits in Special Education

  • Improvements in Autism: Decreased Echolalic Behavior (55)
  • Benefits for Mentally Retarded Subjects: Improved Social Behavior;
    Improved Cognitive Functioning; Increased Intelligence; Improved Physical Health (56, 57)

4. Improved Health

Improved Mind-Body Coordination

  • Faster Reactions (58–60)
  • Increased Psychomotor Speed (61)

Increased Energy and Dynamism

  • Increased Energy and Enthusiasm (13, 37, 54)
  • Increased Physical and Mental Well-Being (17, 50)
  • Decreased Fatigue (37)

Reduction of Stress-Related Health Problems

  • Reduction of High Blood Pressure in Adolescents and Adults (62–64)
  • Decreased Insomnia (65)

Reduction of Health Care Costs

  • Lower Health Insurance Utilization Rates: Significantly Fewer Hospital Inpatient Days, and Outpatient Visits in All Age Categories; Fewer Inpatient Admissions for All Major Categories of Disease (66)
  • Longitudinal Reduction in Health Care Costs (67)

5. Benefits for Society: Creating an Influence of Coherence and Harmony in Collective Consciousness

Fifty research studies verify that when large groups of individuals practice the Transcendental Meditation and TM-Sidhi programs with Yogic Flying together in one place, they radiate a measurable influence of coherence in the whole society:

  • Reduced Crime (68–71)
  • Reduced Deaths due to Homicides, Suicides, and Accidents (72)
  • Improved Overall Quality of Life (70, 73–75)
  • Improved Economic Trends (76)
  • Reduced Conflict and Violence (70, 77–78)

Educational institutions can be the source of harmony and peace for the whole society. The above findings indicate that through Consciousness-Based Education the schools of any country, or one large higher education institution, can create and maintain peace and invincibility for the nation. As the students and teachers are individually rising to higher states of consciousness, they will be radiating a steady influence of positivity in national consciousness, benefiting all areas of national life.

Scientific Research References for Findings Cited in this Document

  1. Human Physiology 25: 171–180, 1999.
  2. Zeitschrift für Elektroenzephalographie und Elektromyographie EEG-EMG 7: 99–103, 1976.
  3. International Journal of Neuroscience 10: 165–170, 1980.
  4. Motivation, Motor and Sensory Processes of the Brain, Progress in Brain Research 54: 447–453, 1980.
  5. Psychophysiology 27 (Suppl.): 4A (Abstract), 1990.
  6. Psychophysiology 14: 293–296, 1977.
  7. Physiology & Behavior 59: 399–402, 1996.
  8. International Journal of Neuroscience 14: 147–151, 1981.
  9. Psychosomatic Medicine 46: 267–276, 1984.
  10. Scientific Research on Maharishi’s Transcendental Meditation and TM-Sidhi Programme: Collected Papers, Volume 1: 705–712, 1977.
  11. International Journal of Neuroscience 54: 1–12, 1990.
  12. Gedrag: Tijdschrift voor Psychologie 3: 167–182, 1975.
  13. Dissertation Abstracts International 38(7): 3372B–3373B, 1978.
  14. Personality and Individual Differences 12: 1105–1116, 1991.
  15. Intelligence 29: 419–440, 2001.
  16. Higher Education Research and Development 15: 73–82, 1995.
  17. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 57: 950–964, 1989.
  18. Memory & Cognition 10: 207–215, 1982.
  19. Journal of Social Behavior and Personality 17: 65–91, 2005.
  20. Journal of Social Behavior and Personality 17: 47–64, 2005.
  21. International Journal of Neuroscience 15: 151–157, 1981.
  22. Perceptual and Motor Skills 65: 613–614, 1987.
  23. Perceptual and Motor Skills 39: 1031–1034, 1974.
  24. Journal of Creative Behavior 13: 169–180, 1979.
  25. The Journal of Creative Behavior 19: 270–275, 1985.
  26. Psychophysiology 34: S89 (Abstract), 1998.
  27. Biological Psychology 55: 41–55, 2000.
  28. Biological Psychology 61: 293–319, 2002.
  29. Education 107: 49–54, 1986.
  30. Education 109: 302–304, 1989.
  31. Scientific Research on Maharishi’s Transcendental Meditation Programme: Collected Papers, Volume 1 (Rheinweiler, Germany: Maharishi European Research University): 396–399, 1977.
  32. British Journal of Educational Psychology 55: 164–166, 1985.
  33. Journal of Counseling Psychology 19: 184–187, 1972.
  34. Journal of Counseling Psychology 20: 565–566, 1973.
  35. Journal of Social Behavior and Personality 6: 189–247, 1991.
  36. Academy of Management Journal 17: 362–368, 1974.
  37. Anxiety, Stress and Coping 6: 245–262, 1993.
  38. Journal of Social Behavior and Personality 17: 93–121, 2005.
  39. Perceptual and Motor Skills 64: 1003–1012, 1987.
  40. Gedrag: Tijdschrift voor Psychologie 4: 206–218, 1976.
  41. Dissertation Abstracts International 38(6): 3351A, 1977.
  42. Dissertation Abstracts International 34(8): 4732A, 1974.
  43. Zeitschrift für klinische Psychologie 7: 235–255, 1978.
  44. Journal of Counseling and Development 64: 212–215, 1985.
  45. Psychotherapie • Psychosomatik Medizinische Psychologie 32: 188–192, 1982.
  46. Journal of Clinical Psychology 33: 1076–1078, 1977.
  47. Journal of Clinical Psychology 45: 957–974, 1989.
  48. Criminal Justice and Behavior 5: 3–20, 1978.
  49. Journal of Offender Rehabilitation 36: 127–160, 2003.
  50. Japanese Journal of Industrial Health 32: 656, 1990.
  51. Health and Quality of Life Outcomes 1: 10, 2003.
  52. Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly 11: 13–87, 1994.
  53. Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly 11: 219–236, 1994.
  54. Dissertation Abstracts International 38(8): 3895B, 1978.
  55. Scientific Research on Maharishi’s Transcendental Meditation Programme: Collected Papers, Volume 3: 1983–1989, 1989.
  56. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry 42: 35–36, 1981.
  57. Journal of Biomedicine 1: 73–88, 1980.
  58. L’Encéphale 10: 139–144, 1984.
  59. Perceptual and Motor Skills 38: 1263–1268, 1974.
  60. Perceptual and Motor Skills 46: 726, 1978.
  61. Journal of Clinical Psychology 42: 161–164, 1986.
  62. Journal of Psychosomatic Research 51: 597–605, 2001.
  63. American Journal of Hypertension 17: 366–369, 2004; 18: 88–98, 2005.
  64. Hypertension 26: 820–827, 1995; 28: 228–237, 1996.
  65. Journal of Counseling and Development 64: 212–215, 1985.
  66. Psychosomatic Medicine 49: 493–507, 1987.
  67. American Journal of Health Promotion 10: 208–216, 1996; 14: 284–291, 2000.
  68. Social Indicators Research 47: 153–201, 1999.
  69. The Journal of Mind and Behavior 9: 457–486, 1988.
  70. Journal of Conflict Resolution 32: 776–812, 1988.
  71. Psychology, Crime, and Law 2: 165–174, 1996.
  72. Social Indicators Research 22: 399–418, 1990.
  73. The Journal of Mind and Behavior 8: 67–104, 1987.
  74. Psychological Reports 76: 1171–1193, 1995.
  75. Proceedings of the Social Statistics Section of the American Statistical Association (Alexandria, VA: American Statistical Association): 38–43, 1996.
  76. Proceedings of the American Statistical Association, Business and Economics Statistics Section (Alexandria, VA: American Statistical Association): 799–804, 1987; 491–496, 1988.
  77. Journal of Social Behavior and Personality 17: 285–338, 2005.
  78. Proceedings of the Social Statistics Section of the American Statistical Association (Alexandria, VA: American Statistical Association): 297–302, 1990. (79) Deans, A.
  79. A Record of Excellence: The Remarkable Success of Maharishi School of the Age of Enlightenment. Fairfield, IA: Maharishi University of Management Press, 2006.

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